Mojito Isleño ~ Islander Sauce

0
2255
Mojito Isleño ~ Islander Sauce
Mojito Isleño ~ Islander Sauce
Paid Advertisement

Mojito Isleño or Islander Sauce is a Puerto Rican recipe that is most commonly used as a chunky topping for a variety of fish and shellfish dishes, but it can also be served on the side. The dish originated in Salinas, Puerto Rico also known as “La Cuna del Mojito Isleño” (the cradle of the islander dip).

Variations of Mojito Isleño

  • With boiled and shredded chicken it is perfect for taquitos or as a chicken antipasto.
  • Add coconut milk to taste and let it thicken a little.
  • For a cup of mojito add two cups of grated cheese and melt. Served with tostadas or fried corn tortillas.
  • With white beans, it’s also delicious with white rice.
Mojito Isleño ~ Islander Sauce

Mojito isleño

David Taylor
One of the most famous sauces in Puerto Rico is full of flavors typical of the Caribbean with all the Creole flavor of Puerto Rican cuisine.
Prep Time 10 mins
Cook Time 10 mins
Total Time 20 mins
Course Condiment
Cuisine Puerto Rican
Servings 24 servings
Calories 350 kcal

Ingredients
  

  • ½ cup olive oil
  • 1 oz. vinegar
  • 1 ½ cups water
  • 1 cup tomato sauce
  • 1 bell pepper chopped
  • 4 tsps. garlic powder
  • 1 med. onion chopped
  • 5 leaves recao or cilantro chopped
  • 2 laurel leaves
  • 4 oz. capers
  • 4 oz. pimientos morrones (whole red roasted peppers)
  • salt and pepper to taste

Instructions
 

  • Combine all ingredients in medium saucepan. Cook over low heat, stirring occasionally, until onions and green pepers are tender. Remove bay leaf. Season to taste with pepper.

Notes

Serve with Crab Meat Piononos, fish, or shellfish. Store tightly covered in the refrigerator.

Where Did Mojito Isleño Come From?

The restaurant Ladi’s Place in Salinas, Puerto Rico is where the original mojo isleño recipe was perfected in 1938. The owner at the time, Eladia “Ladi” Correa used a recipe from the Canary Islands which she modified using local ingredients. At her restaurant, which to this day still boasts a stunning view of the Caribbean Sea from its rustic terrace, she served fish and seafood freshly caught by the local fishermen, topped with a generous dose of her special sauce.

Some 80 years later, the recipe has become part of the identity of Salinas. Every restaurant that serves mojo isleño has their own way of making it, but the base remains the same: fresh ingredients cooked over low heat then stored overnight to let the flavors deepen and mesh together.

Paid Advertisement

LEAVE A REPLY

Recipe Rating




Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.